Tag Archives: Saskatchewan Ministry of Agriculture

Crop Report for July 29 to August 4, 2014

From the Saskatchewan Ministry of Agriculture

Saskatchewan’s livestock producers now have 72 per cent of the hay crop baled or put into silage, with an additional 13 per cent ready for baling, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture’s weekly Crop Report.

Rain showers and high humidity are keeping swathes from drying properly and have decreased hay quality in some areas. At this time, eight per cent of the hay crop is rated as excellent in quality, 77 per cent good, 14 per cent fair and one per cent poor.

Rainfall in the province ranged from nil to several inches. While rain was welcomed by many producers to help alleviate dry conditions, additional rain will be needed to help later-seeded crops mature and fill. Across the province, topsoil moisture on cropland is rated as five per cent surplus, 84 per cent adequate, 10 per cent short and one per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as three per cent surplus, 79 per cent adequate, 16 per cent short and two per cent very short.

Pasture conditions are rated as 15 per cent excellent, 68 per cent good, 15 per cent fair and two per cent poor. Livestock producers have adequate water supplies for their animals.

There are reports of crops starting to turn. Desiccation of peas and lentils has just started in some southwestern and west-central areas. Some crops that were damaged by recent hail are being swathed for feed. Strong winds, heavy rain and damaging hail have caused the majority of crop damage this week. Grasshoppers and leaf spot diseases have also caused some damage.

Farmers are busy haying, hauling grain and getting ready for harvest.

ripening grain

West-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 6B – Hanley, Outlook, Loreburn, Saskatoon and Arelee areas; Crop District 7A – Rosetown, Kindersley, Eston, Major; CD 7B – Kerrobert, Macklin, Wilkie and Biggar areas)

Recent rain showers and high humidity are delaying haying progress and swath dry down for many producers in the region. Seventy-one per cent of the hay crop has been baled or put into silage, with an additional 15 per cent cut and ready for baling. Hay quality is rated as four per cent excellent, 64 per cent good and 32 per cent fair.

Crops are quickly advancing in the region and some producers may begin desiccation and swathing operations within the next week or two on earlier-seeded crops. However, the majority of crops are still behind normal developmental stages for this time of year. Recent storms brought strong winds, heavy rain and damaging hail to some areas of the region and some hail damaged fields are now being cut for feed. There have been reports of higher than expected disease levels in some crops while some producers continue to spray for grasshoppers in lentil crops.

The Major area received the most rain this week with 70 mm, bringing its total amount received since April 1 to 343 mm. Topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as eight per cent surplus, 85 per cent adequate, six per cent short and one per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as five per cent surplus, 85 per cent adequate and 10 per cent short.

Pasture conditions are rated as 23 per cent excellent, 67 per cent good and 10 per cent fair. Livestock water availability is adequate at this time.

Farmers are busy haying, hauling grain and getting ready for harvest.

Harvest progress most advanced in West Central Sask.

SASK. AG CROP REPORT FOR THE PERIOD SEPTEMBER 17 TO 23, 2013

Harvest is progressing well despite recent rains in many areas of the province.  Saskatchewan farmers now have 71 per cent of the 2013 crop combined, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture’s Weekly Crop Report.  Twenty-one per cent is swathed or ready to straight-cut.  The five-year average (2008-2012) for this time of year is 60 per cent combined and 23 per cent swathed or ready to straight-cut.

Harvest progress is most advanced in the west-central region, with 86 per cent of the crop combined.  Sixty-two per cent is combined in the southeast; 79 per cent in the southwest; 60 per cent in the east-central region; 68 per cent in the northeast and 73 per cent in the northwest.

Of the crop that has been harvested, average to above-average yields are being reported in most areas; however, they vary from region to region.  Spring wheat average yields are reported as 46 bushels per acre, durum 44 bushels per acre, barley 68 bushels per acre, canola 38 bushels per acre, and peas 43 bushels per acre.

harvest

If you look carefully, you can see a double rainbow in the sky above this harvested field. Taken September 23, 2013 in West Central Saskatchewan

West-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 6B – Hanley, Outlook, Loreburn, Saskatoon and Arelee areas; Crop District 7 – Rosetown, Kindersley, Eston, Major, Kerrobert, Macklin, Wilkie and Biggar areas)

The west-central region is the most advanced area of the province with 86 per cent of the crop combined and 10 per cent swathed or ready to straight cut.  The five year average (2008-2012) for this time of year is 56 per cent combined.  Crop district 7A has 91 per cent combined, 6B 83 per cent combined and 7B has 84 per cent of the crop combined.  Little to no rain was received last week, helping farmers stay in the field.

Estimated yield ranges for the region are reported as follows: winter wheat 30 to 50 bu/ac, spring wheat 30 to 60 bu/ac, durum 37 to 60 bu/ac, oats 65 to 100 bu/ac, barley 50 to 80 bu/ac, fall rye 30 to 40 bu/ac, flax 25 to 35 bu/ac, canola 30 to 48 bu/ac, mustard 1000 to 2000 lb./ac, lentils 1200 to 2400 lb./ac, peas 30 to 60 bu/ac and canary seed 750 to 1500 lb./ac.  Overall, quality is good and many farmers are expecting to wrap up harvest in the next week or two.

Topsoil moisture conditions continue to deteriorate and are rated as 13 per cent adequate, 49 per cent short and 38 per cent very short on cropland. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 14 per cent adequate, 44 per cent short and 42 per cent very short.  The region has not received significant rainfall in over a month and all crop districts are reporting that almost half of acres are short of topsoil moisture.

Crop and combine fires have been reported in many areas.

Producers are busy finishing harvest operations, working fields and starting fall weed control.

Crop Report – Aug. 6 to 12

pea field

Bright-green peas in the field east of Unity, near Wilkie, Aug. 13 confirm the statement in the Saskatchewan Crop Report for the West-Central District that “Most crop reporters are indicating harvest operations are 10 days to two weeks behind normal compared to the last couple of years.”

Farmers are reminded that the Saskatchewan Crop Insurance deadline to select winterkill coverage for fall rye and winter wheat is Aug. 25.

The Crop Report for our area also said, “Most areas of the region recorded some rainfall for the week which will help crops on dry soil fill as harvest operations get underway. Most of the region has been missing the moisture that other areas have received over the past few weeks and soil conditions were very dry in some areas … Rainfall reported in the past week ranged from nil to 52 mm (Kindersley area). The highest cumulative rainfall in the region since April 1, 2013, has been recorded at Major, SK (352 mm).”