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Crop Report for July 29 to August 4, 2014

From the Saskatchewan Ministry of Agriculture

Saskatchewan’s livestock producers now have 72 per cent of the hay crop baled or put into silage, with an additional 13 per cent ready for baling, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture’s weekly Crop Report.

Rain showers and high humidity are keeping swathes from drying properly and have decreased hay quality in some areas. At this time, eight per cent of the hay crop is rated as excellent in quality, 77 per cent good, 14 per cent fair and one per cent poor.

Rainfall in the province ranged from nil to several inches. While rain was welcomed by many producers to help alleviate dry conditions, additional rain will be needed to help later-seeded crops mature and fill. Across the province, topsoil moisture on cropland is rated as five per cent surplus, 84 per cent adequate, 10 per cent short and one per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as three per cent surplus, 79 per cent adequate, 16 per cent short and two per cent very short.

Pasture conditions are rated as 15 per cent excellent, 68 per cent good, 15 per cent fair and two per cent poor. Livestock producers have adequate water supplies for their animals.

There are reports of crops starting to turn. Desiccation of peas and lentils has just started in some southwestern and west-central areas. Some crops that were damaged by recent hail are being swathed for feed. Strong winds, heavy rain and damaging hail have caused the majority of crop damage this week. Grasshoppers and leaf spot diseases have also caused some damage.

Farmers are busy haying, hauling grain and getting ready for harvest.

ripening grain

West-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 6B – Hanley, Outlook, Loreburn, Saskatoon and Arelee areas; Crop District 7A – Rosetown, Kindersley, Eston, Major; CD 7B – Kerrobert, Macklin, Wilkie and Biggar areas)

Recent rain showers and high humidity are delaying haying progress and swath dry down for many producers in the region. Seventy-one per cent of the hay crop has been baled or put into silage, with an additional 15 per cent cut and ready for baling. Hay quality is rated as four per cent excellent, 64 per cent good and 32 per cent fair.

Crops are quickly advancing in the region and some producers may begin desiccation and swathing operations within the next week or two on earlier-seeded crops. However, the majority of crops are still behind normal developmental stages for this time of year. Recent storms brought strong winds, heavy rain and damaging hail to some areas of the region and some hail damaged fields are now being cut for feed. There have been reports of higher than expected disease levels in some crops while some producers continue to spray for grasshoppers in lentil crops.

The Major area received the most rain this week with 70 mm, bringing its total amount received since April 1 to 343 mm. Topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as eight per cent surplus, 85 per cent adequate, six per cent short and one per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as five per cent surplus, 85 per cent adequate and 10 per cent short.

Pasture conditions are rated as 23 per cent excellent, 67 per cent good and 10 per cent fair. Livestock water availability is adequate at this time.

Farmers are busy haying, hauling grain and getting ready for harvest.

Latest report on crop progress

With the flooding in southeast Saskatchewan, we thought it might be a good time to update readers on the latest crop report. The following is from the report for July 1 to 10, 2014

Province of Saskatchewan

Warm weather in much of the province has helped with crop development and haying.  Livestock producers now have six per cent of the hay crop cut and one per cent baled or put into silage, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture’s weekly Crop Report.

Many producers on the east side of the province continue to deal with localized flooding and saturated fields.  Although weather conditions have improved, many crops in these regions have been significantly affected by the excess moisture.  Early estimates suggest that between two million to three million acres have been flooded and are unlikely to produce a crop.

Topsoil moisture conditions are improving for many areas.  Across the province, topsoil moisture on cropland is rated as 34 per cent surplus, 64 per cent adequate and two per cent short.  Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 25 per cent surplus, 71 per cent adequate, three per cent short and one per cent very short.

The majority of fall cereals are in the shotblade to dough stages of crop development, while most spring cereals are in the tillering to shotblade stages.  The majority of pulse crops are in the vegetative to flowering stages and flax crops are mostly in the seedling to flowering crop stages.  Most canola and mustard crops are in the seedling to flowering stages of development.

Crop damage this week is attributed to excess moisture, localized flooding, hail, wind and insects such as the cabbage seedpod weevil.  Root rots and leaf spot diseases have also caused some damage.  There is adequate water available for livestock, and pasture conditions are rated as 27 per cent excellent, 62 per cent good, 10 per cent fair and one per cent poor.

Farmers are busy controlling pests and haying.

West Central Saskatchewan

Six per cent of the hay crop has been cut and less than one per cent has been baled or put into silage. Hay quality is rated as 89 per cent good and 11 per cent fair; yields are not expected to be as high as normal in many areas. Crop reporters rate pasture conditions as 44 per cent excellent, 49 per cent good and seven per cent fair. Livestock producers report having adequate water supplies for their animals.

Rainfall in the region ranged from small amounts to 35 mm in the Landis area. The Sonningdale area continues to lead the region in total rainfall, having received 287 mm of rain since April 1. Topsoil moisture on cropland is rated as five per cent surplus, 94 per cent adequate and one per cent short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as three per cent surplus, 90 per cent adequate and seven per cent short.

Localized flooding, wind, insects and diseases such as root rots are causing the majority of damage this week. Spraying continues and many producers are now spraying fungicides in some fields. A storm went through the area bringing baseball-sized hail and high winds. There are reports of several tornadoes touching down and damaging fields and yards.

Farmers are busy haying, controlling pests and hauling grain.

canoia

Harvest almost complete

SaskAg Crop Report for West-Central Saskatchewan, Oct. 1 – 7

Harvest is essentially complete in the region: 97 per cent of the crop is combined. The five-year average (2008 to 2012) is 83 per cent combined. The amount of rainfall in the region last week ranged from nil to 36 mm (Dinsmore area). Sixty-seven per cent of the flax and 69 per cent of the canaryseed (two minor crops) have been combined. Yields well above the 10-year average are being reported.

Spring wheat grades are rated as 79 per cent 1CW, 17 per cent 2CW and four per cent 3CW.

Although some areas received rain last week, topsoil moisture conditions are still very dry. Twenty per cent of the crop land has adequate topsoil moisture, 50 per cent is short and 30 per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 28 per cent adequate, 45 per cent short and 27 per cent very short.  Many areas in the region have not had a significant rainfall in over a month and a half. In crop districts 7A and 7B, over 43 per cent of the cropland, hay land and pasture is very short of topsoil moisture.

Producers are busy with fall weed control operations, hauling bales and bringing cattle home from pastures.

Above average yields in most of province

Of the crop that has been harvested, average to above-average yields are being reported in most areas. Spring wheat average yields are reported as 47 bushels per acre, durum 44 bushels per acre, barley 69 bushels per acre, canola 38 bushels per acre and peas 43 bushels per acre. Average yields vary from region to region, depending on seeding conditions and growing season moisture.  Provincial spring wheat quality is estimated to be above average. Grades for spring wheat are estimated as 59 per cent 1CW, 31 per cent 2CW, nine per cent 3CW and one per cent CW feed.

Crop progress before the rain

With our area escaping the rain experienced during the September 24 to 30 period covered by the latest Crop Report from Saskatchewan Agriculture, we continued to be ahead of the rest of the province in harvest progress.

West-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 6B – Hanley, Outlook, Loreburn, Saskatoon and Arelee areas; Crop District 7 – Rosetown, Kindersley, Eston, Major, Kerrobert, Macklin, Wilkie and Biggar areas)

The west-central region is the most advanced area of the province,  with 95 per cent of the crop combined and four per cent swathed or ready to straight-cut. Crop districts 7A and 7B recorded very little rain and so combines continued to roll in those areas. Rain ranged from nil to 62 mm (Hanley area). Spring wheat combined ranges from 90 to 100 per cent; oats 50 to 100 per cent; barley 40 100 per cent; canola 80 to 100 per cent and flax 10 to 100 per cent combined. Flax and canaryseed crops are being combined. Many farmers have completed harvest and others hope to finish within the week.

With some areas receiving very little rain, topsoil moisture conditions continue to deteriorate and are rated as 16 per cent adequate, 37 per cent short and 47 per cent very short on cropland. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 22 per cent adequate, 30 per cent short and 48 per cent very short. Many areas in the region have not received a significant rainfall in over a month. Crop districts 7A and 7B are reporting over 40 per cent of the cropland, hay land and pasture is very short of topsoil moisture. Crop and combine fires have been reported in many areas.

Pasture conditions are rated as three per cent excellent, 13 per cent good, 43 per cent fair, 28 per cent poor and 13 per cent very poor.

The majority of the crop damage was caused by strong winds (of up to 80 km per /hour) that damaged some swathed crops. Producers are busy finishing harvest, working fields and starting fall weed control.

Provincially

Seventy-nine per cent of the 2013 crop is now combined, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture’s weekly Crop Report. Significant rainfall recorded last week slowed harvest progress in most areas of the province. Fifteen per cent is swathed or is ready to straight-cut. The five-year average (2008-2012) for this time of year is 74 per cent combined and 18 per cent swathed or ready to straight-cut.

Harvest progress is most advanced in the west-central region, where 95 per cent of the crop is combined. Seventy-two per cent is combined in the southeast; 85 per cent in the southwest; 68 per cent in the east-central region; 74 per cent in the northeast and 88 per cent in the northwest.

Rainfall throughout the province ranged from nil to 81 mm. Many areas received over 35 mm of rain, and heavy precipitation was reported in the southwestern, east-central and northeastern regions. Many areas in the southwestern, southeastern and east-central regions have been experiencing rain delays for a couple of weeks.

Across the province, topsoil moisture on cropland is rated as five per cent surplus, 65 per cent adequate, 19 per cent short and 11 per cent very short. Topsoil moisture on hay and pasture land is rated as two per cent surplus, 63 per cent adequate, 24 per cent short and 11 per cent very short.

Pasture conditions are rated as nine per cent excellent, 43 per cent good, 29 per cent fair, 16 per cent poor and three per cent very poor.

Rain and strong winds caused the majority of the crop damage. The rain has resulted in bleaching and sprouting of some cereal crops. Wind has caused some shattering losses in swathed canola and ripe crops.

Farmers are busy combining, hauling bales and completing fall weed control operations.

 

Harvest progress most advanced in West Central Sask.

SASK. AG CROP REPORT FOR THE PERIOD SEPTEMBER 17 TO 23, 2013

Harvest is progressing well despite recent rains in many areas of the province.  Saskatchewan farmers now have 71 per cent of the 2013 crop combined, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture’s Weekly Crop Report.  Twenty-one per cent is swathed or ready to straight-cut.  The five-year average (2008-2012) for this time of year is 60 per cent combined and 23 per cent swathed or ready to straight-cut.

Harvest progress is most advanced in the west-central region, with 86 per cent of the crop combined.  Sixty-two per cent is combined in the southeast; 79 per cent in the southwest; 60 per cent in the east-central region; 68 per cent in the northeast and 73 per cent in the northwest.

Of the crop that has been harvested, average to above-average yields are being reported in most areas; however, they vary from region to region.  Spring wheat average yields are reported as 46 bushels per acre, durum 44 bushels per acre, barley 68 bushels per acre, canola 38 bushels per acre, and peas 43 bushels per acre.

harvest

If you look carefully, you can see a double rainbow in the sky above this harvested field. Taken September 23, 2013 in West Central Saskatchewan

West-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 6B – Hanley, Outlook, Loreburn, Saskatoon and Arelee areas; Crop District 7 – Rosetown, Kindersley, Eston, Major, Kerrobert, Macklin, Wilkie and Biggar areas)

The west-central region is the most advanced area of the province with 86 per cent of the crop combined and 10 per cent swathed or ready to straight cut.  The five year average (2008-2012) for this time of year is 56 per cent combined.  Crop district 7A has 91 per cent combined, 6B 83 per cent combined and 7B has 84 per cent of the crop combined.  Little to no rain was received last week, helping farmers stay in the field.

Estimated yield ranges for the region are reported as follows: winter wheat 30 to 50 bu/ac, spring wheat 30 to 60 bu/ac, durum 37 to 60 bu/ac, oats 65 to 100 bu/ac, barley 50 to 80 bu/ac, fall rye 30 to 40 bu/ac, flax 25 to 35 bu/ac, canola 30 to 48 bu/ac, mustard 1000 to 2000 lb./ac, lentils 1200 to 2400 lb./ac, peas 30 to 60 bu/ac and canary seed 750 to 1500 lb./ac.  Overall, quality is good and many farmers are expecting to wrap up harvest in the next week or two.

Topsoil moisture conditions continue to deteriorate and are rated as 13 per cent adequate, 49 per cent short and 38 per cent very short on cropland. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 14 per cent adequate, 44 per cent short and 42 per cent very short.  The region has not received significant rainfall in over a month and all crop districts are reporting that almost half of acres are short of topsoil moisture.

Crop and combine fires have been reported in many areas.

Producers are busy finishing harvest operations, working fields and starting fall weed control.

Significant harvest progress

combine and grain truck

The combine rounds a grain truck on its way back to the field to pick up and process more golden swaths of canola.

The latest Saskatchewan Crop Report released by the Saskatchewan Ministry of Agriculture September 12, covering the week of September 3 to 9, reports great harvest progress and bounteous crops.

Province-wide, the report said:

Significant harvest progress was made this week, allowing Saskatchewan farmers to move ahead of the five-year harvest average. Thirty per cent of the 2013 provincial crop is combined and 36 per cent is swathed or ready to straight-cut, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture’s weekly Crop Report. The five-year average (2008-2012) for this time of year is 28 per cent combined and 31 per cent swathed or ready to straight-cut.

Harvest is most advanced in the southwestern region, where 46 per cent of the crop is combined. Twenty-eight per cent is combined in the southeast; 23 per cent in the east-central region; 38 per cent in the west-central region; 15 per cent in the northeast and 16 per cent in the northwest. Warm weather over the past few weeks has helped speed crop development.

Of the crop that has been harvested, above-average yields are being reported in most areas. Spring wheat average yields are reported as 43 bu/ac, barley 66 bu/ac, canola 35 bu/ac, lentils 1600 lb./ac and peas 42 bu/ac. Average yields vary from region to region, depending on seeding conditions and growing season moisture.

Thunderstorms later in the week dropped over 60 mm of rain in some parts of the south. Province-wide, the week’s rainfall ranged from nil to 86 mm. Grasshoppers, wind and heavy rains caused the majority of the reported crop damage.

Across the province, topsoil moisture on cropland is rated as three per cent surplus, 59 per cent adequate, 30 per cent short and eight per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as one per cent surplus, 54 per cent adequate, 35 per cent short and 10 per cent very short. Some areas in the western and central regions are very dry, affecting pasture productivity.

Farmers are busy desiccating, swathing and combining.

And in West-Central Saskatchewan:

Thirty-eight per cent of the 2013 crop is combined and 38 per cent is swathed or ready to straight-cut. Most areas recorded no rain during the week, allowing combines to keep moving in the field. Rainfall in the region ranged from nil to 8 mm (Craik area). Crop districts 6B and 7A have 41 per cent combined and Crop District 7B has 32 per cent combined. Crop reporters are indicating yields are well above average in most areas of the region.

Topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 31 per cent adequate, 46 per cent short and 23 per cent very short on cropland. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 21 per cent adequate, 44 per cent short and 34 per cent very short. All crop districts in the region are reporting over half of the cropland and hay land is short of topsoil moisture. Crop District 6B is reporting 44 and 50 per cent of cropland and hay land and pasture, respectively, are very short of topsoil moisture. Soil conditions are very dry in the region, as most areas have not had a significant amount of rain for a month or more. Dry conditions have resulted in a few grass, stubble or combine fires.

Grasshopper populations are high, but very little damage was reported as most crops are into the maturity stages. Dry conditions are causing the majority of crop stress.  High winds in crop districts 7A and 7B caused some canola swaths to blow around. Producers are busy harvesting and hauling hay.

 

Harvest underway everywhere

swathed canola

Drive anywhere near Unity and you are sure to see swathed canola in the field, waiting for the combine.

According to the latest Saskatchewan Crop Report, released by the Ministry of Agriculture August 29, harvest is underway everywhere in the province. Five per cent of crops had been combined and 14 per cent were swathed or ready to straight-cut. Although harvest operations are behind the five-year average for this time of year, yields are above average. The five-year average (2008-2012) is 15 per cent combined and 22 per cent swathed or ready to straight-cut.

For our area specifically, the crop report says:

West-Central Saskatchewan (Crop Districts 6B – Hanley, Outlook, Loreburn, Saskatoon and Arelee areas; Crop District 7 – Rosetown, Kindersley, Eston, Major, Kerrobert, Macklin, Wilkie and Biggar areas)

Two per cent of the crop has been combined, and 19 per cent has been swathed or is ready to straight cut. Thirty-nine per cent of winter wheat, 21 per cent of peas and 19 per cent of lentils have been combined. Forty-two per cent of canola has been swathed. Very little rain was recorded for the week, allowing producers to get a good start on harvest. Of the crop that has been harvested, crop reporters are indicating yields are above average for most areas of the region. Rain recorded ranged from nil to 10 mm (Biggar area). Soil conditions are very dry in the region as most areas have not had a significant amount of rain for a month or more.

Topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 46 per cent adequate, 44 per cent short and 10 per cent very short on cropland. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are rated as 35 per cent adequate, 46 per cent short and 19 per cent very short. All crop districts in the region are reporting more than one third of the crop and hay land is short of topsoil moisture.

Very little crop damage was reported in the region. Dry conditions are causing the majority of crop stress. Producers are busy with harvest operations.

 

Saskatchewan Agriculture Crop Report

swathing canola

Saskatchewan Agriculture’s crop report for August 13 to 19, says “warm weather with very little rain interruptions over the past week has helped speed crop development.  Harvest operations have begun in many areas of the province.” The many areas include Unity as swaths were down in some of the canola fields nearby. The photo above was taken north-east of Unity, near Cloan, Aug. 20.

With reference to crop districts 6B and 7, West-Central Saskatchewan, the report reads as follows:

Warm weather has helped with crop maturity over the past several days. One per cent of peas have been combined in the region. Seven percent of canola, three per cent of mustard, 12 per cent of peas and nine per cent of lentils have been swathed or are ready to straight cut. Very little rain was recorded for the week ranging from nil to 7 mm (Perdue area). Most of the region has been missing the moisture that other areas have received over the past few weeks and soil conditions were very dry in some areas. Most crop reporters are indicating harvest operations are 10 days to two weeks behind normal compared to the last couple of years.

Topsoil moisture conditions are rated as one per cent surplus, 53 per cent adequate, 39 per cent short and seven per cent very short on cropland. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are rated as one per cent surplus, 44 per cent adequate, 42 per cent short and 13 per cent very short. All crop districts in the region are reporting at least one third of the crop and hay land is short of topsoil moisture.

Very little crop damage was reported in the region. Dry conditions and bertha armyworms are causing the majority of crop stress. Producers are busy getting ready for harvest.

Crop Report – Aug. 6 to 12

pea field

Bright-green peas in the field east of Unity, near Wilkie, Aug. 13 confirm the statement in the Saskatchewan Crop Report for the West-Central District that “Most crop reporters are indicating harvest operations are 10 days to two weeks behind normal compared to the last couple of years.”

Farmers are reminded that the Saskatchewan Crop Insurance deadline to select winterkill coverage for fall rye and winter wheat is Aug. 25.

The Crop Report for our area also said, “Most areas of the region recorded some rainfall for the week which will help crops on dry soil fill as harvest operations get underway. Most of the region has been missing the moisture that other areas have received over the past few weeks and soil conditions were very dry in some areas … Rainfall reported in the past week ranged from nil to 52 mm (Kindersley area). The highest cumulative rainfall in the region since April 1, 2013, has been recorded at Major, SK (352 mm).”